Studying in New Zealand for Korean Students

Travelling for work and leisure is a way of life for the Korean people. In fact, the influx of Koreans in the different parts of the globe has in its own right, paved the way for the Annyeong fever in the mainstream media. New Zealand relations with South Korea have flourished over the years due in large part to the number of Korean tertiary students opting to get world-class education in NZ. Koreans are the fourth largest group of international students in the country. About 55 percent of Koreans in New Zealand attends a private tertiary institution while the remaining 45 percent is divided between the primary and secondary schools. Thinking of joining the club? Here are the essential things that you need to know.

Preliminaries

Your dream of studying in a New Zealand institution will start to materialize when you lodge an application for a specific course or program. Not sure which one is right for you? Try this online study options guide <https://www.studyinnewzealand.govt.nz/study-options/programmes/#module-36>.  One of the most important requirements for a student visa is an unconditional offer of place coming from an educational provider in NZ. Admission requirements vary from one institution to another, but keep in mind that providing all the relevant information is essential for a successful admission. Read up and don’t forget to check and double check.

Once you have secured a spot in a learning institution in New Zealand, it is now time to apply for a student visa. All application forms are accessible through <www.immigration.govt.nz/forms>. Student visa applications must be lodged at the New Zealand Vis Application Centres (VAC) in Seoul. Got more questions? You may find the answers here <http://www.vfsglobal.com/newzealand/southkorea/english/contact_us.html >.

Essentially, the immigration office will want to see evidence that you are accepted in a learning institution and that you can financially support yourself once you are in New Zealand. Checklist for a Student Visa for Korean nationals can be found here <https://www.immigration.govt.nz/documents/checklists/korea/checklist-for-korea-student-visa-general.pdf >.

Getting There

The distance from Seoul to Auckland is about 6000 miles which makes most flights an 11-hour sitting contest. Korean Air, Air New Zealand, and Asiana Airlines have non-stop flights to and from NZ. Getting there shouldn’t be a problem. Once you are in NZ, getting around will prove to be a breeze. InterCity, the national coach service of the country has extensive networks and affordable fares. Save a bit of cash by getting a bus pass. If you are going to travel long distances, it would be faster and more cost-effective to travel by plane. With 25 domestic airports connecting flights in NZ, this should be rather easy.

Living Costs

There is no single formula in determining your living costs. How much you really need will be dependent on your lifestyle and the region of NZ you live in. Some essentials are more expensive in one region than another. For example, weekly rent in Auckland will cost you $ 512, more than double of what you will shell out if you stay in Southland ($ 228). The New Zealand Estimated Food Costs for 2018 Basic diet estimates that you will need $ 61-71 per week if you are in Wellington, but only $ 57-67 if you are in Christchurch.

Need some inspiration to cut living costs? Here’s one for you < https://www.studyinnewzealand.govt.nz/blog/5-ways-cut-your-living-costs-while-you-study-new-zealand/>

Opportunities

New Zealand is one of the best places to be an international student. Apart from getting world-class education, your stay in NZ will enable you to work part-time while studying. Who wouldn’t want extra cash to offset living costs and save a little cash? If you have a Student Visa, you may be allowed to work up to 20 hours per week during the term and full-time during holidays. If you’re getting your Masters or PhD, you may work full-time all year round.

Support

It’s easy to feel lonely in a foreign land if you don’t have a support network. Don’t be a stranger and reach out. There are a variety of Korea-NZ national associations ready to guide you. People from the motherland have also established local associations in most NZ learning institutions. Go out there and explore.

Pursuing further studies in a land different from your own is both exciting and scary. Get an experience of a lifetime by embarking on your very own New Zealand adventure.