Posts

Top tips on how to balance your studies and work opportunities

According to the Department of Home Affairs, when you’re a Subclass 500 (student visa) holder, you can: 1.) participate in an eligible course of study in Australia, 2.) travel in and out of Australia and 3.) work up to 40 hours every 2-week period once your course starts. Given this privilege, making the most out of your education journey is tough especially juggling your studies and your work opportunities. Hence, one important question to ask is, how do you manage to study and working at the same time?

An article from the Good Universities Guide suggests these following tips:


Let work know your school schedule

Most places that employ students understand the temporary nature of uni schedules. They change every semester and may render you unable to work on certain days of the week. Therefore, it’s best to tell your employer that you are a uni student and that you may have to change your roster around sometimes.

If possible, try and get a job near school

This is easier if your campus is in the city, but if not, it’s still possible. An easy way to work plenty of shifts and still attend your classes is finding a job either on campus or right near it. This means you can work on the same day you have classes.

You can go in early to work a few hours before or you can stay on and work after night. You’ll have your uni work on you if you get a chance to do some study on your break. You’ll have your uniform on you ready to change quickly if you are required to start slightly early. If you want to rake in the cash quick, working somewhere near uni allows you to work heaps of shifts.

Don’t always sleep in

Sleeping in until 10 every morning feels great but really, you lose plenty of time. Even waking up at 9, or 8.30, gives you an extra hour or so to begin some work on an assignment or prepare food for your break. If you are going to sleep at an hour that isn’t too late, then this slight shift in your sleep schedule won’t ruin you. If anything, you will be more productive and can get plenty of work done before heading off to wherever you need to go.

Find that balance

If you’re missing classes you should be attending just to work every day of the week, then maybe uni isn’t for you. Think about the amount of money you pay just to attend a semester of uni. If you find yourself feeling exhausted and unable to see friends, then work a little less.

Drop one shift a week, just to have some time to yourself or out seeing friends. Mental health is important. If you want your lifestyle of part-time employment and uni studies to be sustainable and successful, then work out your balance and enjoy it. It’s a pretty fun time. Make friends, have some laughs and do everything right to get that qualification and some money with it.

As a Migration Education International (MEI) client, we will assist you by accessing and interpreting the most current information from the Australian Government, assessing your eligibility to get a Student visa, and preparing your application to give you the best chance of success. Every applicant is different, so it is important you get advice that is relevant to your situation.

We will help you compile the right documents, complete all of the application requirements, write a comprehensive covering submission and lodge your student visa application on your behalf. We will then liaise with the Australian Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) on your behalf.

Overseas Students in Australia records another double-digit growth

Australia is set for another record reaching double-digits with 720,150 students enrolled across various sectors as of September 2019.

Overseas student numbers in Australia set its record by 11.4% in 2018 and 12.6% in 2017.

The overseas student population was comprised of the growth from the higher education and vocational (VET) sectors, contributing 12% and 17% year-over-year increases, respectively. ELICOS increased with 3% growth while there was a small decrease recorded for schools and non-award programs having -4%.

Here are the top countries where overseas students are sourced out:

  • China (28% of the total)
  • India (15% of the total)
  • Nepal (7% of the total)
  • Brazil (4% of the total)
  • Vietnam (3.5% of the total)

While student visa holders in Australia are focused mainly on study options, they also are entitled to work rights. They are entitled to work up to 40 hours per fortnight or 20 hours per week while their course is on-going while they can also work full-time during term breaks or holidays.

Education agents are one of the major players of this growth in which they source out overseas students to study in Australia. With over 20 partner education institutions offering over 100 different courses in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, MEI can help you choose a course and a college that suits your career and life ambitions. Our qualified counselors will provide you with expert guidance, based on your goals and circumstances. We listen to you and provide personal advice that will help you navigate your way to success.

Studying in Australia for Vietnamese Students

Many Asian students have chosen Australia’s top-notch educational system to advance their studies. Of these, a respectable number comes from Vietnam. Part of this is due to the fact that the country is a top provider of government scholarships to Vietnam since 1970. The other part is the objective quality of the institutions that offer options for international students. If you’re looking to join the trend of your countrymen pursuing studies in the Land Down Under, here’s what you need to know.

Before You Get To Go

The first thing that you need to actually get out of the way is your acceptance into an Australian educational institution as this is a critical requirement. From there, all you need is health insurance and you can apply for a student visa. It costs VND 9,500,000 to acquire but it will last you for five solid years. Once you’re there, you can even apply for a permit to work if you prefer having a part time job to alleviate expenses.

The Flight There

From the capital of Vietnam, Hanoi, to Australia is a distance of about 6,000 km give or take. This translates to a travel time of over 8 to 9 hours roughly. That’s assuming that you take a direct flight via Korean Air and are headed to Sydney. To get to Canberra via direct flight is significantly longer at 12 hours and 10 minutes.

The Higher Cost of Living

It’s important to note that there is a significant gap in the costs of living between Vietnam and Australia. On average, prices in Australia are twice as they would be in Vietnam. That includes everything from rent to groceries and even affordable meals at a restaurant. For example, a one-bedroom apartment at a city center will cost you VND 28,000,000 in Australia what would cost only VND 9,000,000 in Vietnam. Most critical market books, in fact, are up to twice or thrice the price that you would pay in Vietnam.

A Higher Income Potential

The good news is that there is an equally noticeable disparity between the minimum wage paid out between the two countries. In Vietnam, that comes down to VND 1,390,000 whereas in Australia, that’s up to VND 45,700,000. Healthcare professions—a very popular career path in Vietnam—can earn as much as VND 1,700,000,000. That’s a hefty fifty times more than what can be earned in Vietnam.

Sixth in Size

There is a very strong and thriving community of Vietnamese in Australia. While they can be found in all corners of the country, they have historically been concentrated in Melbourne and its suburbs. A fun fact is that Nguyen is slowly overtaking Smith as Australia’s most common surname. These communities have housing and even stores owned and operated by Vietnamese immigrants. At over 300,000 Vietnamese all over the major city centers of Australia, it’s much easier to feel closer to home.

Ushering in a New Year

While not widely celebrated in Australia by Australians, Tet Nguyen Dan—the Vietnamese New Year—is celebrated raucously within the thriving Vietnamese community there. While work in Australian-owned companies doesn’t stop, you can expect those in Vietnamese quarters to close down. Many families open their doors to visitors—especially fellow Vietnamese—to allow them to join in the festivities even if they are far from home.

There are some challenges to studying in Australia. But with the potential to earn more and a large community for support, students dreaming of expanding their education to Australia will be well rewarded and, ultimately, not too far from home.

How MEI helped me in my School Application in Australia

I came here to Australia to pursue my studies in Master of Accounting in Uni, and unfortunately, things turned bad for what I have expected. I’ve struggled with my academics and lost hope of continuing. Uni only gave me a month to stay in Australia and my visa will be canceled. I thought of giving up and going back to my country as I thought that there would be no chances for me to stay.  My previous employer recommends me to check the ICAE school and they are telling me good things about it. At first, I have hesitations but when I checked the school’s website, I thought that maybe I should give it a try. I applied online and I was impress that I immediately got a response. They emailed me everything that I needed to do and helped me accomplish it as soon as possible. Mr. Sean Mahoney also let me come to class even though my application is still on process cause he wants me to catch up and learn lots of things. He always keeps me updated on my visa processing and provides me useful information. He also addressed any of my concerns and assured me of my Visa.

During my studies, I thought that it would be hard for me cause I have no idea what is Hospitality here in Australia is all about. But I am impressed with all of the ICAE’s teachers as they help us become successful. They focused on our weaknesses so that they can help us improve it and see our strengths as our great asset. They keep on encouraging us to learn and boost our confidence. Also, they provide us with very useful materials that we could use for our future reference. The school facilities are also great for us to explore our talents and improve them.

I must say that my experience here in Australia is unforgettable and I am very thankful to the ICAE MEI for giving me the opportunity. I am now halfway through to finish my studies and I wouldn’t be able to achieve this without the help of the school and for everyone working there. I am honored and grateful.